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Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

1 edition of Selected abstracts on carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer found in the catalog.

Selected abstracts on carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer

Selected abstracts on carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, National Technical Information Service [distributor] in Bethesda, Md, Springfield, Va .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • CEA (Oncology) -- Abstracts.,
  • Colon (Anatomy) -- Cancer -- Abstracts.,
  • Rectum -- Cancer -- Abstracts.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesCarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer.
    StatementAgop Y. Bedikian, consulting reviewer.
    GenreAbstracts.
    SeriesOncology overview
    ContributionsBedikian, Agop Y., International Cancer Research Data Bank., National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvi, 106 p. ;
    Number of Pages106
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17544062M

    Abstract:Background: Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) is a recommended prognostic marker in Colorectal Cancer (CRC) for tumor diagnosis and monitoring response to therapy. High CEA levels are specifically associated with CRC progression and increased levels of the marker are expected to fall following surgical by: 4.   Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is one of the most commonly used tumor markers whose overexpression was first discovered in colorectal cancer and followed by cancers in the aerodigestive tract and Author: Yen-Shou Kuo, Ming-Yi Zheng, Mo-Fan Huang, Chia-Cheng Miao, Li-Hao Yang, Tsai-Wang Huang, Yu-Ting Ch.

      Algorithm 2: Investigation pathway for a patient with a de novo raised carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). a Organ-specific investigations: tumor markers, CT scan, colonoscopy, gastroscopy, mammography, cystoscopy, US, bone scan, biopsy, other test as required. Clinical review includes: a full history and examination of the thyroid, breast, thorax, abdomen and pelvis, visual field testing, Author: Claire Hall, Louise Clarke, Atanu Pal, Pamela Buchwald, Tim Eglinton, Chris Wakeman, Frank Frizelle. Identification of carcinoembryonic antigen-producing cells circulating in the blood of patients with colorectal carcinoma by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. S Jonas, S Windeatt, A O-Boateng, C Fordy, and T G Allen-MershCited by:

      Significantly increased anti‐tumor activity of carcinoembryonic antigen‐specific chimeric antigen receptor T cells in combination with recombinant human IL‐12 Xiaowei Chi The Engineering Research Center of Synthetic Polypeptide Drug Discovery and Evaluation of . benefit of postoperative adjuvant therapy for patients with cervical cancer is uncertain, and moreover, may increase morbidity. In this study, patient age, clinical stage of the cancer, tumor size, and levels of serum squamous cell carcinoma cell antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen were studied in patients with Stage Ib and IIa squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix to.


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Selected abstracts on carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer Download PDF EPUB FB2

Selected abstracts on carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer Author: Agop Y Bedikian ; International Cancer Research Data Bank.

Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a glycoprotein antigen generally used for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment monitoring of several types of tumors, including colorectal cancer.

Nucleic acid aptamers are DNA or RNA oligonucleotides capable of binding with high specificity and affinity to a molecular target. The effect of baseline carcinoembryonic antigen level and other pretest patient characteristics; The diagnostic accuracy of the trend in carcinoembryonic antigen level; Diagnostic accuracy of carcinoembryonic antigen level in detecting early compared with late recurrence; The test interval; Chapter 6.

Discussion. Main findingsCited by: 6. Selected abstracts on carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer / By Agop Y.

Bedikian, National Cancer Institute (U.S.) and International Cancer Research Data Bank. Abstract. The level of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is often elevated in the serum of patients with cancer. This article reviews the clinical usefulness of this observation. Carcinoembryonic antigen is not useful for detecting asymptomatic cancer; its sensitivity and specificity are not high, particularly for early stages of disease, so in.

International Cancer Research Data Bank: Selected abstracts on carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer / (Bethesda, Md.: U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, ), also by Agop Y.

Bedikian and National Cancer Institute (U.S.) (page images at HathiTrust). Abstract Carcinoembryionic antigen (CEA) Carcinoembryonic antigen. Clinical application. Vay Liang W. Go MD. This use for assessment of therapy in selected patients or for following those known to be at high risk for cancer appears promising in preliminary studies, but clinical value, if any, remains to be determined.

Abstract Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a tumor marker for lung cancers of small cell (SCLC) and non‐small cell (NSCLC) types, belongs in a multigene family which includes non‐specific cross‐reacting antigen (NCA) and biliary glycoprotein 1 (BGP).Cited by: A human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)‐producing cell line, T3M‐4, has been established from explant cultures of a primary human pancreatic exocrine adenocarcinoma transplanted into nude mice.

The tumor had metastasized in the patient. The tumor obtained from metastatic lymph nodes was the initial source for implantation in athymic nude mice.

Introduction: Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) surveillance is recommended in patients with colorectal cancer for detection of potentially resectable metastases. In patients with appropriate symptoms, a highly increased CEA concentration (> 5 times the upper limit of normal) is.

Abstract Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a tumor marker of wide clinical use though its function remains unknown. The CEA counterpart and some related macromolecules cannot be demonstrated in mice, thus prohibiting studies of CEA function by gene disruption by: Antigen, Carcinoembryonic, Carcinoembryonic Antigen, carcinoembryonal antigen, ANTIGENS CD E, CD E ANTIGEN, Lymphocyte antigen CD66E, Started inthis collection now contains interlinked topic pages divided into a tree of 31 specialty books and chapters.

Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a kDA cell surface glycoprotein overexpressed in 90% of gastrointestinal malignancies, including colon, gastric, rectal, and pancreatic tumors, 70% of lung cancers, and about 50% of breast cancers.

7 Thompson 8 initially reported on the molecular cloning of the CEA gene from a human genomic library. DOI: /JCO_suppl Journal of Clinical Oncology - published online before print Phase Ia and Ib studies of the novel carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) T-cell bispecific (CEA CD3 TCB) antibody as a single agent and in combination with atezolizumab: Preliminary efficacy and safety in patients with metastatic Cited by: PURPOSE: To describe the features of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) that are important for its use in vaccination approaches and review the clinical experience with therapeutic vaccines targeting CEA.

METHODS: A PubMed search was performed on CEA, along with various qualifiers such as cancer vaccines, epitopes, and function. Relevant articles were reviewed. RESULTS: CEA is a member of the Cited by: Correlation of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) with oxidative stress in carcinoma lung Conference Paper (PDF Available) in Annals of Oncology 26(suppl 9) December with 26 Reads.

Abstract: Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a glycosylated protein of MW kDa, is overexpressed in a wide range of human carcinomas, including colorectal, gastric, pancreatic, non-small cell lung and breast carcinomas.

Accordingly, CEA is one of several oncofetal antigens that may serve as a target for active anti-cancer specific immunotherapy.

P Multicenter validation of the postoperative carcinoembryonic antigen combined prognostic model for stage III colon cancer J. Zhu1, Y. Liu2, R. Zhang3, J. Fan1 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China, 2Department of Colorectal Surgery, Harbin Medical University Cancer.

Nanopores have become one of the most important tools for single-molecule sensing, but the challenge for selective detection of specific biomolecules still exists. In this contribution, we develop a new technique for sensing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), one of the important cancer biomarkers, using solid-state nanopores as a tool.

The method is based on the specific affinity between aptamer Author: Haoran Tang, Hao Wang, Cheng Yang, Dandan Zhao, Yuanyuan Qian, Yongxin Li.

Abstract Background: The human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), which is expressed in several cancer types, is a potential target for specific immunotherapy using recombinant vaccines. Previous studies have shown that when the CEA gene is placed into vaccinia virus, the recombinant vaccine (rV-CEA) can elicit T-cell responses in both rodents and non-human primates.

Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a tumor marker in the blood or other bodily fluids that can be used to monitor certain cancers such as colorectal cancer. When levels are decreasing, it may indicate that cancer is responding to treatment, and when increasing, may suggest a recurrence, progression, or spread (metastasis) of the used along with imaging studies and other tests, it.Abstract.

Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a glycoprotein with a mol mass of kDa was first described in by Gold and Freedman (). The protein core consists of a single polypeptide chain, containing a amino acid NH-terminal domain and three highly homologous domains of amino acids each (Beauchemin et al., ; Oikawa et al., a).1.

Author(s): Bedikian,Agop Y; International Cancer Research Data Bank.; Cancer Information Dissemination and Analysis Center for Diagnosis and Therapy.

Title(s): Selected abstracts on carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer/ Agop Y. Bedikian, consulting reviewer.